STEM Education

Perhaps the greatest barrier to economic success — for society as a whole, and for young people — is young people’s lack of readiness for the workforce, both generally and in particular when it comes to education in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math). A solid foundation in STEM is a proven path to upward mobility; yet it’s a path many young people — especially women and those from disadvantaged backgrounds — don’t take.

While the reasons are complex and varied, tech companies are well positioned to address these issues by leveraging their financial and human resources through partnerships with schools, charities, and governments. Arm’s partnerships include:

 STEM 2020 Scholars Program

STEM 2020 Scholars Program

A partnership, initiated by Arm, between Villiers Park Educational Trust, The Smallpiece Trust, and The Arkwright Scholarships Trust that provides scholarships, internships, conferences, “family STEM events,” and other resources to schools where high deprivation impedes progression into higher education.

Code Club

Code Club

An Arm-supported not-for-profit organization where volunteers (including our own) teach young people in more than 10,000 clubs and over 100 countries how to code in Scratch, HTML, CSS, and Python by making games, animations, and websites. In November 2015, Code Club joined forces with Arm’s long-standing partner, The Raspberry Pi Foundation, to help even more young people learn how to code.

1000 Girls, 1000 Futures

1000 Girls, 1000 Futures

A groundbreaking initiative to engage young women in STEM and advance their pursuit of STEM careers through one-on-one engagement with peers and female STEM professionals. It’s part of the Arm co-founded Global STEM Alliance (GSA) in partnership with the New York Academy of Sciences, whose joint mission is to increase the number and diversity of students in STEM.

Microbit

micro:bits

In 2015 with financial and technical support from Arm (hardware design, software development kits, compiler services, etc.), these pocket-sized codeable computers were initially given free to every 12-year-old across the UK. Since then, Arm has continued its partnership with Micro:bit, ensuring that appropriate learning materials accompany its global reach to hundreds of thousands of young people all over the world.